Submissions invited for Out of the Fire Anthology of the Mother Lode: Butte Fire Memories

Cate Culver: Mixed Media art stemming from the Butte Fire in Calaveras County, 2015

Out of the Fire

Editors invite submissions of Butte Fire stories, poems, photography, art, and all media invited for inclusion in the website online ezine titled Out of the Fire. The September 9, 2015 fire destroyed over 500 homes and another few hundred structures, many of them dwellings, displacing families and individuals permanently, forcing them to relocate and to start all over. The collection commemorates a disaster that devastated several small communities in the beautiful foothill region of the Sierra, the Mother Lode, one that continues to reverberate change. Reflection and insight on the event, one of many historic fire events in our area, brings great art and writing and creativity into the mix, aiding the healing process and providing solace for many.  Go to the website, www.manzapress.com and find Cate Culver’s phoenix image. Below that mixed media art work are links that give more information about the project that nonprofit Manzanita Writers Press is sponsoring. There is a submission form, so just fill it out, scan it and send it back with your attached submission. Follow the instructions and send us work that adds to the many voices communicating a love for this region, its natural beauty and the wonderful people it nurtures,  and providing a sense of looking back and moving forward at the same time. Send us your inspirational creations. We will help you edit the work, so don’t agonize if you are nervous about grammar, usage, and whether your work is good enough. Call us if you have any questions, or email us.

www.manzapress.com

Adult Coloring with wine and noshing at Manzanita Arts Emporium

Dear friends,

Come join us for relaxing coloring, a glass of wine, a bowl of hot nourishing old-fashioned soup with bread and salad and refreshments on Friday November 25, from 5:30 to 8:30 at Manzanita Arts Emporium.  Hot mulled cider, hot tea, cocoa, brownies for dessert, and nice people to hang with. Bring some munchies to share if you like. Come dressed for lounging as you will be among old friends and will most certainly make new friends. Over 200 prismacolor pencils to use and bring your own coloring book or share ours.  It’s free, but RSVP, please by calling 209-728-6171 or emailing manzanitawp@gmail.com  – see you then! We’ll keep the place lit for you. Address: Manzanita Arts Emporium, 1211 S. Main St., Suite 110, Angels Camp, CA 95222.  www.manzapress.com

You may want to do some holiday shopping while you’re there, with gifts of fine art from the heart by Calaveras artists, jewelry, wood furniture, art and photography cards, Metzger scented candles, fine art prints and photography, Folkmanis puppets, wood alphabet puzzles (limited supply–the last ones available by the artist), children’s books, hand-blown glass ornaments, Mark Twain and Gold Rush historical books, local regional authors’ books, and more.

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WRITERS ROUNDUP AT THE MARK TWAIN WILD WEST FEST OCT 14-16

 

Manzanita Writers Press Presents

First Annual Writers Roundup Retreat

At the Mark Twain Wild West Fest

Friday, Oct. 14 – Location: Manzanita Arts Emporium, 1211 S. Main St, Angels Camp, 95222

 Lasso Effective Media Marketing Techniques

9-11:30 – The Social Media Frontier – Marketing Your Creative Side on Facebook with the Get Smart Group, Facebook and social media experts – limited to 30 participants – reserve your space early.

11:30-1 Lunch on your own

1-3:30 – Website Wrangling, Blogging, and Alternative Media Marketing with Linda Lee, Bay Area website marketing guru – limited to 30.

4-4:30 – Roundtable discussion – Participants share experiences with marketing – what works and what doesn’t

Saturday, Oct. 15All day Main Street activities and Author Fair BoothMark Twain Wild West Fest – Dress up as your favorite literary character from the 1800s, steam punk Wild West style. Liars Contest on stage. Sourdough Slim, Black Irish Band, and two more bands. Meet the producers of the Mark Twain Finds His Voice – the 88 Days film, and Jim Fletcher, author of the book, Mark Twain’s 88 Days in the Mother Lode. Free street entertainment. Manzanita Arts Emporium salon style green room for participants to hang out, talk with other writers, and schmooze. Free After party with the Jank Tones band, from 6-9, with ho-host food and drinks at Utica Park.

Sunday, Oct. 16Herding Fact and Fiction: A Symposium – Location: Angels Camp Museum, 753 South Main St., Angels Camp, 95222

9-11:30 Telling Tall Tales Out West – with Pat Kaunert, historian, humorist, and Mark Twain reenactor. Experience humor writing in the Mark Twain vein – using exaggeration and understatement as an effective writing tool. Pat will present Gold Rush journalism, mining camp humor, the art of the tall tale, inventing hyperbolic metaphor, and more.

11:30-1 – Lunch on your own

1-3:00  Driving the Truth – historian-authors discuss valuable insight and practical tips in research methods for corralling primary sources and how to organize them effectively — with Julia Costello, Sal Manna, JoAnn Levy, and Antoinette May – a seminar on digging deep to help make history come alive.

Break: 30 min.  3-3:30 PM – $10.00 donation/public admission.

3:30-4:30 PM – As Fleeting as Gold Dust: A Symposium on Truth in the West – with investigative journalist Scott Thomas Anderson, James Fletcher, and Stephen Finlay Archer. Regional historical authors discuss how writers grapple with facts and decisions made. Discussion includes the state of modern archives, the pitfalls of online research and reflections on interviewing witnesses to history.

 4:30-5:30 PM   Mark Twain Out West – Legendary Mark Twain performance by Pat Kaunertshowing the true spirit of the American West, with delightful “stretchers” providing insightful relief from a world of crazy turmoil. Appropriate for all ages, engaging history, audience interaction, and memorable Wild West fun.

5:30-6:30 PM – Surprise guest planned – an esteemed representative from a local indigenous tribe will discuss storytelling and preserving narrative the Native American way. More information to come on this!

 Fees for the conference:  by Sept. 1 – $160 includes all three days of activities including participation in the author book fair and all talks and sessions.  After Sept. 1, price is $170 for all three days.

Friday OR Sunday only: $90/per day –  Writers Roundup participants can be featured in the book fair booth on Saturday with either session Frid or Sat fee paid. Pay online with a credit card:  www.manzapress.com  and fill out a short registration form.Or, download the registration form, fill it out, and mail it with a check to Manzanita Writers Press, PO Box 460, Angels Camp, CA 95222 — OR visit the Manzanita Arts Emporium,1211 S. Main St., Angels Camp, CA 95222.

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Check out the new Manzanita Arts Emporium!

Manzanita Writers Press is situated in Historic Downtown Angels Camp, surrounded by wonderful artists and writers’ books in a gorgeous gallery. MWP publishes local and regional authors, community anthologies and historical collections.

MWP hosts Writers Unlimited meetings for writers of all levels, workshops, literary and historical events, lectures, and more.

Artists and photographers featured in the gallery include photographer Ty Childress, botanical artist Janet Trinkle, geometric abstract artist Gary Rose, wood artist and furniture maker Andy Trinkle. Then there is watercolor artist Kevin Brady, acrylic and oil equestrian and bovinic painter Patty Payne, jeweler Roberta Hughes, and oil artist George Haskell.

Other artists and photographers: Wanda Mozcosiek and Robert Standiford, Paul Neil, Judy Wilmot, Cate Culver, Gordon Long, Shay Baker, and Susie Hoffman.

Books:  a large Mark Twain book collection where you can find scholarly books about Mark Twain as well as his novels and collected works.

The bookstore features Manzanita Writers Press authors, such as Glenn Wasson, Jim Fletcher, Stephen Archer, Ted Laskin, Dave Self, Monika Rose, Scott Thomas Anderson, Denella Kimura, Joy Willow, Sy Baldwin, Amy Smith, and other writers from our region.

Check out the Facebook page and our Manzanita Arts emporium website page.  Come in and visit, have a cup of tea, and chat with the editors about your new writing project.

Location:  1211 S. Main St., Suite 110, Angels Camp, CA 95222  Phone: 209-728-6171  – open every day except Tuesday, 10 am to 5 pm.  Writers Unlimited meets 1st and 3rd Monday mornings at 10:30, and 2nd and 4th Monday evenings from 6:30-9:30.

 

eBook publishing workshop was a success!

Lou Gonzalez led a wonderful workshop on formatting the eBook using Word last Saturday in San Andreas. The writers that participated are moving ahead with their writing projects and we’ll be reading their books on the Kindle or Nook or ipad some time soon!  You wouldn’t think that in such a small, rural atmosphere, we’d have this virtual neo-Renaissance of literary writing—but there it is and there we are.

 

 

 

 

Art Reception – Hard-Edge Design and Writing Workshop on Ekphrasis – Writing About Art –

Gary Rose, artist, and Monika Rose, poet, had a reception on Friday, October 14, from 2-7 PM, for an art show, ekphrasis workshop, and poetry reading/signing at the open house reception at Mountain Ranch Community Center in the darling community of Mountain Ranch! Art show and reception occurred 2:00 P.M. through 7 PM – with artist Gary Rose, featuring his large, geometric hard-edge design wall sculptures and join a chat with the artist about minimalism, design, and modern art. His work will be visible from October through November at the center.

EkphrasisWorkshop  (writing about art) with Monika Rose   3-4 PM Writers and public art lovers enjoyed this art form, which is writing about visual art, dramatic art, presentation art, and more.  River by the Glass, a 212-page collection of poems spanning two decades, was signed by the author.

 

 

Books and anthologies with editing work by Monika Rose

River by the Glass River by the Glass front cover small, A Collection of Poems by Monika Rose

Released, April 2011- 212 pages, 85 poems, photography by Tuolumne County talent Ron Pickup

River photography includes Tuolumne River, Clavey River, Stanislaus River, and more….

Publisher, GlenHill Productions, Soulsbyville

Purchase on this site.  $21.95, add shipping and tax: $28.50

 

 

 

 

Wild Edges: volume 6 of Manzanita – Poetry and Prose of the Mother Lode and Sierra

Editor: Monika Rose – Published Aug. 2010 – pub. Manzanita Writers Press – 216 pages featuring over 100 poets and fiction writers from California and the U.S. Over 30 photographers and artists featuring their work – a 16-page full color glossy spread by talented artists and photographers of the Mother Lode and Sierra – Purchase from Manzanita Writers Press for $15.00.  2,000 printed – 1,000 remaining        Wild Edges - volume 6 Manzanita anthology front coveradd tax and shipping

 Some of the writers featured: J.P. Dancing Bear, Mara Feeney, Taylor Graham, Ted Laskin, Linda Field, Jim Lanier, Ron Pickup, Helene Pilibosian, Jackie Richmond, Monika Rose, Andy Shupala, Allegra Silberstein, Laura Snyder, Norine Radaikin, Jackie Rogers, William Keener, Bill Gainer, Michael Lee Johnson, Brad Buchanan, Zoe Keithley, Shelley Muniz, Joseph Milosch, Kathy Isaac-Luke, Kevin Arnold, Moira Magneson, Barbara Leon, W.F. Lantry, Carol Ann Lindsay, James Jacobs, Jodi Hottel, Gail Entrekin, Johm Fitch, Maureen Flannery, Lara Gularte, Dianna Henning, Lisa Gelfand, Connie Corcoran, Sandy Crepps, Chrissy Davis, Donald Anderson, Dawn Bonker, David Anderson, Marta Brady, Barbara Bass, Tim Bellows, Gary Cooke, Alan Cohen, Leslie Bailey, Marcia Adams, Glenn Wasson, Dorothy Wake, Andrena Zawinski, Patricia Wellingham-Jones, Daniel Williams, Paul Willis, Brigit Truex, David Sullivan, Michael Spinetta, Robert Walton, Anne Wilson, Paula Sheil, Dave Self, Michele Rugo, Dave Seter, Scott Siegel, Anne Privateer, Mark Redfearn, Marie Ross, Nick Samaras, Zara Raab, and many more…

Cover photo by Paul Neal

 

Manzanita Volume 5 – released Sept. 2008 – 1,500 copies published – 400 remaining

Over 100 writers and artists featured – still in print Manzanita volume 5 Front cover – cover photo by John Doane

Editor: Monika Rose

Published by Writers Unlimited, sells for 15.00 plus tax, shipping

 Back cover volume 5 – photo by Ron Pickup

Poem by Jackie Richmond

Manzanita volume 5 back cover - photo by Ron Pickup - poem by Jackie Richmond

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manzanita – volume 4  – over 100 writers and artists featuredManzanita volume 4 Front cover

Editor, Monika Rose – published by Writers Unlimited, 2006

Now, Manzanita Writers Press

published 2006 – 1,200 copies printed – 50 remain – sells for 15.00

Cover photo by Ron Pickup of Soulsbyville – lovely Manzanita blossoms frosted by a surprise snowstorm in the late spring

 

 

 

Ted Laskin’s collection of Short Stories and Essays

George A. Custer, Please Come to the White Courtesy Phone

Available from the author and Manzanita Writers Press

17.95 plus shipping and handling – 8.25 % tax – total: 23.00

George A. Custer, Please Come to the White Courtesy Phone - by Ted LaskinEditing work: Monika Rose  – Ed. Manzanita Writers Press, 2010

Joy Roberts – chief editor  on the project

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glenn Wasson’s collection of poetry, essays, and flash fiction

Tales Mark Twain Would Have Loved to Steal – revised edition

Tales Mark Twain Would Have Loved to Steal - revised edition - by Glenn WassonEditing work, Monika Rose, Joy Roberts: 2008 and 2010 (2 volumes)

Winner of the Readers Choice Humor Award

Available for 21.95   plus shipping, and 8.25 % CA tax

Total 28.50. 

Publisher: Manzanita Writers Press

Contact author via press

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getty Ambau’s Young Adult Novel

Desta and King Solomon’s Coin of MagicDesta and King Solomon's Coin

Monika Edited: 2009 and 2010  (not exclusively)

Manuscript also reviewed by Lodi High students

 

Formatting a Poetry Manuscript – Saving and Preparing Files and Text

Preparing Your Poetry or Other Manuscript for Publication   © Monika Rose April 2011

A few tips from Monika Rose, Editor  – monikarosewriter.com

These are not conclusive…many more things to think about abound, but these are a few….

Manzanita Writers Press      manzapress.com

1. Saving your Files:

  •      Keep a working folder with your book project name.  

It is important for you to save your drafts and document changes, as well as to save your files in folders that indicate the final draft and date of each poem. Some day, it will be useful to view your drafts and process. Back these all up to a CD or DVD disc, external hard drive, flash drive (which can corrupt). If anything, it keeps MA candidates busy if your work is studied in the future.

  •     I keep a folder for each poem. Inside of that folder are two folders. One has draft documents of the poem with dates, and they are numbered in succession. Each time a change is made, the document is given a new number added to the title and a new date for revision. This tracks any changes made to the poem. The other folder has the one final draft of the poem going to press.
  •     Copy final poetry files that you have labeled to the section folders in your main folder. Do not move them, but COPY them.
  •     When it is time to copy these final drafts into a folder for the publisher, then they are copied in succession from the final draft folder of each poem, into the section folders ready for the publisher.  

2. Organizing your files for the publisher:

  •      Front Matter materials organized in a folder called Front Matter- copyright page, dedication, etc.
  •       Back Matter materials also organized in a folder called Back Matter – author bio, photo, credits, etc.
  •      Sections numbered or saved with titles- with section titles and any quotations/photos
  •      Poetry matter is saved inside each section.  

3. Preparing ancillary materials:

  •       ISBN number – some people advise to purchase your own ISBN # for the book, but publishers do this and they are listed in Ingram and distribution sites – if you self-publish, or partner with another press and exchange printing favors, then purchase your own as well as the bar code afterwards, from the Bowker site online. This takes about a half hour for the process.
  •       Library of Congress Catalog # – obtain this free. It takes about a week or so to get it back via email.
  •       Copyright page – retain copyright of the book – list your name as copyright owner on the copyright page.
  •       Attributions and Credits – where your poems have appeared in print – give publication and dates if possible for every poem
  •       Acknowledgements page – front or back – thank you’s
  •       Dedication – short – usually to one or two people
  •       Blurbs for the Back – quoted lines from other writers and editors or readers to whom you have sent your manuscript to read and give commentary for the back cover
  •       Author page: bio and  photo with photographer caption – saved as a larger tiff and as a jpeg  and name them so you know (two types) – this goes for all photos and images used. 5 or more megapixels camera used(larger files with good resolution are needed – the jpeg files are used for smaller files, web sites, newspaper photos, etc.)  

4. Preparing the text for the manuscript

  •       Fonts – use Times New Roman – or other serif – don’t use a sans serif font

Do not change font styles for titles or anything – don’t bold your lines or use all caps

Some fonts have strange italic styles, or letter configurations. Don’t use different ones.

Stay consistent.

  •        The typesetter and editor will select fonts/depends on the arrangement you have with your publisher. If self-publishing and you want to do your own layout, take Tom Johnson’s class. Learn about fonts and sample them. Some of the fonts don’t print well in a large run and are hard to read.

 5. Use a style manual and study it carefully – Chicago Manual of Style is best

  •       Use Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary -or latest one  www.merriam-webster.com
  •       Check those darn hyphenated (or not) words! I never realized how tricky these were until putting words in print. Edit carefully. It will cost you a lot of money if you send the typed manuscript to the editor and publisher, and then once it is laid out, you discover many changes you want to make to it.

 6. Check your manuscript in Word.

  •       Note spacing issues, spelling, grammar, capitalization of lines  do go through and check to see if your own format is consistent to the lines in the printed poem. Check contractions–are they needed? Get rid of them if possible. Check line length and evenness — visually and rhythmically. Check for best words. It is never too late to revise your poems. W.B. Yeats did this constantly in various printings.  But I would advise that you do this before the book is printed.
  •       Also, set your tools in Word to catch all your errors, including passive construction, grammar, style, etc. Check all spelling options if the word is in red. This saved me several times, and I’m an English teacher! I knew that the word maize was not spelled maise. But I didn’t pay attention to the cute little red line.Good thing we caught it just in time!
  •       Check punctuation carefully. Do you need the extra commas and periods? Get rid of them if they are not necessary. What about those colons?
  •       Use M-dashes for those long dashes poets love to use – Emily, this one’s for you!

            Sometimes, Word will change those double hyphens for you, sometimes not.

Go to insert symbol—look for the M-dash (the longer one). The shorter one is the N-dash.  Do not use that one. Set cursor to the spot and click the dash. Voila! There is no space on either side of the M-dash. However, there is a space after each ellipsis. . .

  •       What style do you want your numbers to be if you have sections numbered in your poems Roman numerals or other? What other styles do you prefer? Page number location, etc.
  •       Check your titles – are they too long?  Do they give everything away too soon?
  •       Epigraphs: These are those dedications after poem titles, or extra information about the place or time the poem references. Indent with an M-dash and then italicize them. Be consistent.
  •       Line length: Depending on the size of your book, your lines, if too long, will automatically be shifted to the next line and will split, depending on spacing
  •       Do this yourself before the heartache comes. Shorter lines are best. Measure your space. For a 6 x 9 formatted book, leave about a 1 and 1/2 inch margin inside and outside, to be safe. Then see if your printed poem fits inside that frame. If not, you need to think about how to split your lines and reform your stanzas. It may mean rewriting. Think about this as you write your poems to save you heartache later. See what editors do with Walt Whitman’s poems and their very long lines.
  •       Speaking about lines, VERY IMPORTANT:

Most poetry is flush left margin, not centered. Think very carefully as to whether you want to center any of your poetry. Unless it’s a concrete/shaped poem, leave it conventional flush left.

  •       Watch stanza consistency. There may be shifts in your lines once the stanzas are laid out, with lines dropped and moved to the next page. Carefully proof your galleys.

 7. Seasoned poets have formed typing habits that can hinder a typesetter:

  •       eliminate your two spaces after a period – only use one space as the computer program adjusts the spacing after a period automatically – difficult to change typing habits practiced over the years, I know
  •       don’t use the space bar, use tabs, to place words in shaped poems or poems that have creative spacing,  and don’t space over to the end of the line. They show up when a typesetter goes to place your poem.   
  •       single space your poems and double space between stanzas – if a stanza is split at the bottom of the page, then indicate the stanza break or indicate the stanza is continuous if it goes to the next page – best thing is to keep stanzas intact.
  •       turn off your system’s hyphenation if you have prose poetry
  •      don’t justify (don’t full justify – the block symbol in the tool bar) 

8. For more book manuscript information, check this site online:

http://www.press.umich.edu/press/authinfo/auguide.jsp

 

Contact MWP local layout designer as a reference: Joyce Dedini   imacoolcat64@yahoo.com

For any other advice, contact Manzanita Writers Press. We would be happy to help.  

manzapress.com

mrosemanza@jps.net

 

Monika Rose, Editor

Joy Roberts, Business Manager, Editor

Linda Field, Fiction editor, Events Coordinator

Copyright 2011 – Monika Rose